Friday, September 26, 2008

On Photography

An interesting point Sontag brings up is that from the tourist perspective, photography provides an outlet for the anxieties produced by travel and being outside of our comfort zone when we are in a strange or new place.  She calls it a "friendly imitation of work";

"...stop, take a photograph, and move on.  The method especially appeals to people handicapped by a ruthless work ethic -- Germans, Japanese, and Americans."  It is something that becomes robotic, almost imitating the 9-5 work routine most people endure throughout their daily lives.  It's interesting that the same type of behavior that is helping a person relax while they are on vacation is the same kind of thing they are trying to escape by being on vacation.  People feel guilty for not working, so they emulate it with some other routine that comforts them.  Luckily, it happens to be photography.  A good choice.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

On Photography : Stephen Nesbit

Susan Sontag said "Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out."

How true! In this day and age when you can do just about anything with photographs, is it still a photograph??

Well, just for fun, here is a picture original, and it's modified version. (since we can use any picture that seems relevant).




Wednesday, September 24, 2008

On Photography

"A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened." I'm not sure I agree with this. We hear all sorts of ridiculous things in our lives, and sometimes when we see the photos we still don't believe it. Photographs have always been manipulated so its hard to believe some of what we see anymore.

On Photography


On Photography is an interesting read for anyone wanting to look further into the history of photography and the theory behind it. Susan Sontag explores photography as a cultural phenomenon and how it became this way, which leads you to question why people started taking photographs in the first place.

On Photography



Susan Sontag makes several points in this chapter of her book. The one I've found most interesting is that she takes the time to exclaim that the majority of the photography world has been overrun with photographers that are not artists. This isn't to say that these people are not true photographers or other whatnot.


The image I have posted is actually an image of the author, Susan Sontag. It illustrates her point--photographs are being used much more commonly to convey less a message and more average information, though it is still plain to see after moments that it is not just a profile picture. There is emotion in her face. There is a certain attitude about the lighting of the room. Everything in a photograph will always give information beyond that which was in front of the camera, and thus shape the attitude and moral and ethical standings of its viewers.




Yeah. That just happened.

Susan Sontag on Photography


Why does it mean so much to us with pictures? It is that moment of time but why couldn’t people just remember what happened instead of having that picture? For me I just think about the fact that we have those pictures because we don’t remember everything exactly how it was. We want to remember how we want them to be but when we see that picture we think “Wow, ok I remember that.” May that be good or bad. Does it really matter? Not to me. I have had some of the best times and the worst times, but when I see the pictures I just think “that was me..” and I think people tend to forget that. Pictures were not developed to have what others want you to feel, even though they do that, pictures are worth a thousand words, they are there to make one remember what has happened.

Photography by Diane Arbus


On Photography Photograph



The author described one of his experiences about seeing some images that really caused an impact for him. In pages 19-22 he writes, "Nothing...in photographs or in real life ever cut me as sharply, deeply, instantaneously." He was talking about images he saw of Bergen-Belsen and Dachau, concentration camps. The image above is of a A crematoria oven where the corpses of prisoners were burned in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. (April 28, 1945). The camp was established in 1940 as a prison. By 1943 it was converted into a concentration camp. On April 15th, 1945 the people were liberated.



Mayra

On Reading Susan Sontag


One of the points that Susan Sontag brought up was that photography is often used for the typical "group photo." Immediately, it brought to mind a picture I took at my birthday party of my "peeps". Everyone kept grouping together when I had my camera out, when I was actually just trying to take photos of them being their normal geeky selves. This also brought to mind where she spoke about photography about being non-intervention. I tried my best to not intervene, but what can I say....the camera makes some people do the strangest things.

Diane Arbus

I had to put this up because I love wheelchairs and it looks like the person is wearing a mask. So I really dig the combination of the two.

diane arbus


diane arbus is a master portrait photographer. we are often exposed to magazines with "flawless" (looking) human beings. arbus' work shows people who are not usually in the eye of the public. this is why her work stands out.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

On Photography


I don't know if this picture was actually done by Diane Arbus, it kind of looks like it, but its so awesome I thought I'd put it up here anyway. 

-Jessica Stockton

On Photography

Susan Sontag Reading/Diane Arbus photo

This picture reminds me of Diane Arbus's quote "I always thought of photography as a naughty thing to do-that was one of my favorite things about it."

-Laura LaVergne

Susan Sontag Reading


I thought that this photo fit the Susan Sontag reading. The picture displays not only the emotion of the soldier, but demonstrates how a picture can sway thought. In the photo the soldiers are shown as loving, caring, human people, as opposed to what there job entails.

Derek Klayum

On Photography

To me, this photo demonstrates what Susan Sontag was describing, how it has become customary to document every part of an event or vacation with a photograph. It's almost as if the photo is needed to even prove that it ever existed. I love how the "group photo" has become so customary that even when someone doesn't even want to take the photo they go along anyway because that's just the way things are done.

I don't think photography is dead.  I think that no matter what advances we make in the world of photography people will always find a way back to film photography.  I think that digital photography is a great place to explore.  The imagination of photo montage can take you anywhere and I think that is very exciting.
-Ortolf
I really enjoy this photograph.  This moment for the child looks to be terrible but I love the way the camera is right up in her face just capturing every emotion. 
-Ortolf

Susan Sontag Reading

Arbus-esq photo

I chose this photo because of the anger, confusion, and intimidation portrayed by the individual. This photo, which is of the actor Tony Trejo, was taken by photographer Estevan Oriol. The majority of Oriol's work is in black and white, and usually features Latinos and gang members. Much of his work shows a glimpse into what gang life is like. He takes shots of average people, as well as celebrities such as Eminem, Snoop Dog, Lance Armstrong, and Tim Roth. Oriol also collaborates many times with celebrity tattoo artist Mr. Cartoon.

Photo for On Photography

an Arbus-like photograph of a prostitute
-Racheal Johnson-

On Photograph

I posted this Diane Arbus photograph because I think that her photographs challenge photography ethics. If I knew more about her motives for taking the pictures that she did, I might be able to justify or understand what she was trying to get across. For me, a person seeing this photograph years later and in a completely different society than the one she lived, I don't know what this photograph has really accomplished for the person in it. - Tayler

On Photography


I found this picture of a boy walking through Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. It was taken by George Rodger in 1945.The reason a chose this photo was that in the article Susan Sontag said "One's first encounter with the photographic inventory of ultimate horror is a kind of revelation: a negative epiphany. For me, it was photographs of Bergen-Belsen."

Chad Miltenberger

I picked this photo because the kid is holding a grenade, how cool is that.

Sontag makes reference to how the camera will replace the gun, how film will replace bullets. This is evident by the evolution of the safari. So i found some "gun cameras" on Google images (aint the internet great!)

Is Photography Dead?


There is a good quote in this reading by Lisette Model, "Photography is the easiest art, which perhaps makes it the hardest." To me, that is the truth. Photography is virtually one of the easiest forms of art, aim and snap. But to capture the perfect shot at the right moment is where talent is in play. Anyone can aim and hope to get a good picture. Having a keen sense of creativity and being able to go past what is expected in the photographic world is when brilliant shots are captured. Photography isn't dead in my opinion, I just don't think it's considered to be too much of a talented art. 

Photographic Hunt

Monday, September 22, 2008

Is Photography Dead?

I don't think that photography is dead. There is so much photography in our lives so how could it be? It might not be the same as it used to be, but nothing ever is. There is a lot of photo manipulation going on these days, but it doesn't mean that that is all people are doing with their photos. I'm sure there are people who take pictures and leave them alone. I wonder if people were saying the same thing when painters started doing things differently from what everyone else was doing?

Image Hunt

Is Photograpy Dead?


Photography is a form of art. Art is something that cannot be defined, or confined. I think that just because photography is taking on a new median due to recent technological surges, doesn't mean the art in photography itself is dead. I think that the means of taking a photograph, and even the value of a photograph have dramatically changed, but it's photography is still an art in itself, and art is what people make of it. As long as photographs are still been taken and looked at, photography is not dead.

photo hunt

On Photography

By Sarah Richards

Arbus (1960) Children in NYC


Look how happy these kids look. The kid on the right seems to be "giggin" to some music :)

reposted in a better viewer... =/

From slide show


this is much better.

Photo Hunt


-Ortolf

Shawn's hunt

http://picasaweb.google.com/skepfer/ScavengerHunt#slideshow/5248691600619848946

Photo Hunt, oh MY!

Here ya go everyone~

Is Photography Dead?

I think we need to define what "photography" is before we can go around saying that it is a dead art form.  This is almost impossible to do, as the definition is different for everyone.  To the traditionalist, the true spirit of photography may be hard to find these days, but to the 12 year old who has just picked up a camera for the first time, photography is just being born.  However, as the years progress, photography is certainly evolving, perhaps just not for the better, depending on your standpoint.  I think now that anyone can go out buy a digital slr for $500, it's become a little  more difficult to be original with making a photograph.  We can snap off 500 photos, pick the best one, edit it, and print it, all in 30 minutes without having to worry about wasting film, going to the darkroom or the one-hour photo, or spending any money.  Photography is becoming faster, easier, cheapher, more predictable, and less original.  I think those are the things that our society as a whole really value these days, and if we partially define art as something that goes against that and makes us think, then yes, I can see a dark path for photography.  But there are certainly still people who will keep the true spirit of the artform alive. 

Is Photography Dead?


Photography has to deal with the ever growing technology. To say it's dead because of it does not mean that is necessarily true. I thin that it adds to what photography can become. All sorts of amateurs are able to take pictures with ease now, but it does not mean that they are professionals, it just means they are able to make the pictures that they want and for them to appreciate it. Is it not considered photography if you take the best picture of your life on your cell phone?

Is Photography Dead?

I don't think that photo is dead i just think it has evolved. The old contact sheets, dark rooms and negatives are definitely not as common as they once were but the true die hard fans still hold a special place for them. One of Plagens argument is that photos once told the truth by capturing what was in front of that lens, but with the advance in digital technology the truth can be edited out, or created all on its own. What is truth when it comes to photos? The fact is we are able to see more with digital camera then we were through the view finder. We are able to capture an image and see more detail just by zooming in. One can argue that the land scape of photography has changed, but I think that the advance in technology was to make our lives easier. Film was replaced by the memory card so we could store more in a small space. Plagens says that it is what caused photograph to pass away and may be lost unless we can reconnect.

Scavenger Hunt

Sunday, September 21, 2008

Scavenger Art Hunt

Here is mine.  I won't lie; about half of these photos/images were stolen from somewhere on the internet out of sheer laziness.  The other half are ones that I made personally.  Rad.

Scavenger Hunt




And because I have been really out there lately, please enjoy my short film I have decided to call "George" (please use the Spanish pronunciation) for my Imitate Video Using A Still Camera. I would like to blame it all from the fever from having strep throat but George lived with me for a couple of weeks and strep only lasts about 5 days.
video

Is Photography Dead?

I do not believe photography is dead because there is too much going on in the art world related to different kinds of photographs. Whether it is straight photography or photos being manipulated to be used in multimedia works, these photos are always changing and progressing into new styles. I will agree however, that the truth in front of a camera lens is slipping away due to software programs like photoshop, but it is up to photographers if they want to keep this idea in there art form.

The question I would like to pose to the class is whether they think photography should be free to express themselves like many other forms of art works or should it be held to the original perception of truth?

photographic scavenger hunt

Here's a link to my photographic scavenger hunt,

http://s536.photobucket.com/albums/ff322/caitlinehansen/FA%20331%20Photographic%20Hunt/

-Caitlin Hansen

Peter Plagens - Is Photography Dead?

I chose this picture because it's intriguing and mysterious, and completely manipulated by digital tech.

Many would respond to this question with a resounding yes, which is consequently due to digital technology.  However, in reading Peter Plagens article, the he presents evidence that would support the "no" answer.  In retrospective, he presents it so that if it photography is dead, technology in not necessarily the cause.  Certainly since the merge of digital technology and photography, the medium has changed for both good and bad.  Plagens questions whether it has, "fractured itself beyond all recognition?"  I on the other hand feel the medium is naturally evolving and developing, its current status is simply a part of that.  Since the beginning of photography people have manipulated it, so what's being done is basically a new twist on earlier methods.
In this digital age, most people are now aware of what's being done, and take caution in what they believe.  This is an unfortunate outcome of the medium's evolution.  If photos can't act as documentation of the truth, then believe what you know.  What's happening now is a new way to use and develop the medium.  Photography's flight into the fable was inevitable, digital technology just steered it in that direction.  We can be certain however, it would've happened with or without digital tech.   

My Photographic Scavenger Hunt



-Racheal Johnson-

Is Photography Dead?

Is photography dead? It's a question that was probably asked about painting, sculpture, and any number of other mediums throughout the history of the art world. The author of the article makes a good point. It does seem true that the age of photography acting as a sure sign of evidence or truth is over. Now, even the most uninformed of viewers will question the validity of a picture rather than accept it as was common before the age of digital manipulation of images. However, I do not believe that the introduction of new digital and imaging technologies will hurt the artistic value of photography in any way. As a matter of fact, it removes many limitations that were before photographers in the first place. Now, the aesthetic appeal, or even the subject matter is no longer based solely on reality or what the artist can capture through a lens. Now, the only limits placed upon an image is that of the artists imagination or the abilities of the technology. I believe that as long as the product of an artist can reach the emotions, intellect, or imagination of the viewer, there is true value in the art.

Is Photography Dead?

Is photography dead, I don't believe so. No art form is really dead, people still paint, and digital editing definitely didn't kill it. If anything the editing of the photo or the subject within the photo makes it art. The main focus of the article is of the truth of the photograph, and the effects of manipulation upon it. Plain photography of a scene is truth, but the editing of a scene make it false. I think the truth of a scene is irrelevant if your going for art, and saying that photography is dead because it has lost its "link to reality" (according to Plagens) is completely missing the point of art. The expansion of technology does not hinder photography, if any thing it amplifies its artistic possibilities.

Derek Klayum

Is Photography Dead?


I don't think photography is dead. I think there is and always will be an appreciation for the photograph. However, the Newsweek article mentioned in regard to photography, "You can't help but wonder if the entire medium hasn't fractured itself beyond all recognition." I think that some people may think the art of a still, unaltered photograph is dead and that photoshopping and someway manipulating an image is where the art of photography is today. The basic photographs that past photographers have been known for are very basic and therefore some people think lack quality and artistic ability. We live in a society where people always want more. So pictures need to be more exotic and creative to satisfy viewers of today. With new digital technology, it has created so many different styles of photographs. Instead of fighting to keep its head above water don't you think photography should learn to float?

Chad Miltenberger

photographic hunt


Matthew Wright

tba 08

This is an excerpt from a paper that i would like to share as it fits for this class as well:

In contrast to the dreary piece “The Beautiful Struggle” by Lemon Anderson Mike Daisey is the more pleasant and approachable response to the monologuists of the TBA festival. In his piece “Monopoly” he talks about the origins of the board game that Hasboro presents on the box, and the true story of how one person stole the idea from the quakers; the original concept behind the board game was to discourage corporate takeover. Ironically enough the corporation took the game, changed the meaning and purpose, and used it as a corporate tool to make millions of dollars. As a separate sub story, he ties in the story of Edison and Tesla where each would compete against each other in terms of DC power versus AC power. In this monologue the overlying theme is propaganda and how it effects our lives.
Similarly, his other monologue, “If You See Something Say Something” he takes on topics like the atom bomb and the world trade center bombing. The most effective part of the work was when he talked about Los Alamos and the museum dedicated to weapons. He talked about a video where the Americans were bombing the Japanese and the music was in a positive light. The only time the music stopped was when the potentially a million american soldiers would die if they didn’t drop the bomb, and there was no mention of Japanese civilian casualties. This is direct control of public opinion through government propaganda.
What makes his Daisey’s art stand above the rest is taking hugely discomforting topics like paranoia, cooperate takeover, and government propaganda, and he makes it hilarious. Mike Daisey understands the concept that comedy and laughter plays on audience discomfort and he exploits this with a pin-point accuracy.
To describe the work of Khris Soden is difficult. He takes a group on a tour of the town Tilburg in the town of Portland Oregon. There is a supplementary book that was “optional but not needed to experience the tour.” The walk was about two miles and consisted of Soden pointing out the features of another town out of context to the actual setting on the other side of the world. I was confused as to what I was supposed to feel as we walked the streets of Portland. I started to feel a sense of boredom and a little ripped off. The “tourists” hear about a beautiful place with much culture and history, and what we are presented with visually is the Portland cityscape. The boredom presented me with an irony, I asked myself, “why am I bored?” Then I realized that we had past two McDonalds and four Starbucks. The conclusion I came to was this was present the tourists with an outside look at their own town to show a dynamic contrast in a rich culture, and one of a corporate nature.

Scavenger Hunt

Here is the site for my Scavenger Art Hunt

http://picasaweb.google.com/francis.wanda.123/FA331PhotographicHunt?authkey=mOO5GMd8_aw#

Is Photography Dead?


I think that the photograph will never be something of the past. Until we are able to record memories and moments of our history in some other instant format, the photograph will be around for a while still. The new technologies that are now available to manipulate these images are still growing as well as lending themselves to the masses. When people that have no “artistic” skill with a pencil or paint brush are able to create a masterpiece with a camera and computer, we are opening the doors for genius. I am sure that when the great artists of our history were beginning, their work was questioned and second-guessed. With every individual that picks up a camera there is a chance to capture that artistic genius that so defines the art world. So, is photography dead? Not possible, I believe photography is just beginning to reach the state of real art and creativity. You are now able to paint with a computer and sculpt with the help of machines; does that mean that these mediums are no longer considered works of art?

-Racheal Johnson-

Scavenger Hunt




By Paul Amaral

SCAVANGER HUNT SLIDE SHOW

Scavenger Art Hunt




By Derek Klayum

Photographic Hunt


_Jessica Stockton

Is Photography Dead?

No, not in the slightest. Photography has simply evolved like all art forms do, and like most art forms photography has ceased to tell the 'truth' as it once did when a picture could only be manipulated so much in the dark room. Since photographs have often been staged or manipulated to serve the purpose of the artist they often lack any real truth except that they are often beautiful or memorizing in some way, if that is the only truth, the only constant in photography, that is enough for me. 
-Jessica Stockton

Is Photography Dead?

Is photography dead? I think not. However, I do think that photography is in an ethical debate. Photography was once thought to be synonymous with truth. We now know that that was never really true. Photographs have a long history of being altered and staged. Does it make a difference if the photograph is manipulate before it is taken or after the fact in Photoshop? I'm not sure that it does. I think the real confusion for photographers is where to go next. The "easy" photographs of real life have taken. In an age where most people have their own digital camera and one on their cell phone, pictures of real people in their real lives are going to be taken for future history by most of us anyway. I think that the line between high and low art is very blurry, especially in photography. When I think of high art in photography, I think of famous photographs (like the one of the sailor kissing the woman after returning from the war) that capture emotion on very important days or for very important issues (like Ansel Adams landscapes did for the environmental movement). I think that photography's future is very similar to its past. What do you think is the future of photography as high art? - Tayler Black

Photographic Hunt


Tayler Black

It Will Not Go Gently Into the Good Night

Is Photography Dead?
I think not.
While the advancement of technology has allowed every person to pick up a camera become a photographer, I do not believe all great photographs just happen. True, there are the right time-right place photos that even my daughter can capture with her Fisher Price pink camera. But there are many photos that must be created in order for them to be exceptional.
With the advancement of technology the ability to manipulate photographs has become as easy as point and click. While this allows the average photographer to create a more perfect picture, it also allows the "truth" to be removed from the photo. And according to Plagens, art and truth are friends. While this may be a simple concept, I perfer to look at art the same way.
While both types of photos have their own merit, I do like the good old fashioned, what shows up on the film is what you get mentality.
Do you believe that the Photoshop fairytale is just as valid as the original photo?

Photographic Hunt